Publications


1. Patrick, D.M. and K.F. Rhinehart, 1986, Comparative Petrology of the Coarse Clastics in the Natchez and Citronelle Formations, Adams County, Mississippi, Mississippi Mineral Resources Institute, 22 pgs.


The Natchez Formation is distinctive from the Citronelle Formation by being shown petrologically to have a different provenance. In the 1980s, a piece of the Natchez Formation could be found at Natchez Under the Hill. This publication is not recommended for anyone except geologists studying southwest Mississippi sedimentology. The publication can be found here:


http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/mmri/publications/openfile.html


2. Rhinehart, K.F., 1989, The Citronelle Formation in Adams County, Mississippi [abs.]: Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences, v. 34 supplement, p. 60


In February 1989, I made a presentation to the Mississippi Academy of Sciences about what I was learning about the Citronelle Formation in Adams County. It was a cold day in Mississippi. The temperature never rose above freezing the whole day in Jackson.


3. Rhinehart, K.F., and M.A. Meylan, 1991, Petrologic discrimination between the Neogene formations in Adams and Wilkinson Counties, southwestern Mississippi: University of Southern Mississippi; Hattiesburg, MS, Master's Thesis.


In 1991, I finished my master's thesis. This work is cited often in other scholarly journals. Collecting samples around Adams and Wilkinson Counties resulted in my learning much about the geography of the two counties. Because I grew up almost due east from the study area close to the Alabama line of Mississippi, it was nice to explore the southwest corner of the state. An example of a scenic and geologically interesting area is the Clark Creek Natural Area in Wilkinson County.


All or part of this thesis is published in these journals:



Rhinehart, K.F., and M.A. Meylan, 1992, Petrologic discrimination between the Neogene formations in Adams and Wilkinson Counties, southwestern Mississippi: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 42, p. 647-658.


An abstract from this paper can be found here:


http://search.datapages.com/data/doi/10.1306/2DC409A8-0E47-11D7-8643000102C1865D

Rhinehart, K.F., and M.A. Meylan, 1992, Petrologic discrimination between the Neogene formations in Adams and Wilkinson Counties, southwestern Mississippi [abs.]: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 76, p. 1467-1468.


4. Along with the works of four other professors, online compositions were accomplished with a grant from the National Science Foundation for the purpose of creating and publishing online environmental activities. The title of the project is Environmental Science Activities for the 21st Century. Here are works of which I am the primary author:


Population: Age Structure





http://esa21.kennesaw.edu/activities/populationage/populationage.pdf
From Environmental Science Act. (ESA21)
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One of the primary tools that demographers use to understand population is the age structure diagram, a graphic representation that shows the distribution by ages of females and males within a certain population. This lesson describes how these diagrams are constructed and interpreted. It includes an activity in which students use online data on Native American populations from the United States Census Bureau to construct their own diagrams.


Population: Basic Statistics





http://esa21.kennesaw.edu/activities/populationstats/populationstats.pdf




This lesson reinforces the idea that Earth's population, including the population of the United States, is gowing at a dramatic rate. It discusses some of the basics of demography, the study of population and its changes, and introduces key terms used to describe a population. The lesson inlcudes an activity in which students use an online reference to look up some population statistics and answer .



The Nature of Tectonic Plates



http://esa21.kennesaw.edu/activities/tectonics/plate_mechanics.pdf
From Environmental Science Act. (ESA21)
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This lesson provides an overview of the various types of interactions between tectonic plates. The discussion uses the analogy of a cracked egg to describe the tectonic plates composing Earth's crust. Other topics include the concentrated earthquake and volcanic activity associated with plate boundaries, types of interactions at the boundaries, and how plate motions are affecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The lesson includes an activity in which students will use online references to locate a hypothetical nuclear power plant in a geologically safe area, investigate the history of large earthquakes in South Carolina, provide a likely location for a hypothetical geothermal power plant, and others.



Tectonic Plate Movements and Hotspots


http://esa21.kennesaw.edu/activities/platespeed/plate_speed.pdf
From Environmental Science Act. (ESA21)
Comment on this resource


This lesson introduces the idea that rates and directions of plate movements can be measured. The discussion centers on the use of mantle 'hotspots' to determine plate motions. Examples include the Hawaiian Islands, the Galapagos Islands, and the Yellowstone hotspot. The lesson includes an activity in which students use online resources to answer questions about the Galapagos Islands and measure plate movement rates using online data for the Hawaiian Islands hotspot.

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